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Global Trade Negotiations Summary Papers Links

Washington Consensus Links

[1]Williamson, John. “Did the Washington Consensus Fail?” Outline of Remarks at CSIS. Washington DC: Institute for International Economics, November 6, 2002.

[2]Williamson, John. “What Should the World Bank Think About the Washington Consensus?” World Bank Research Observer. Washington, DC: The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, Vol. 15, No. 2 (August 2000), pp. 251-264. [online].

[3] Naim, Moses. “Fads and Fashions in Economic Reforms: Washington Consensus or Washington Confusion?” Working Draft of a Paper Prepared for the IMF Conference on Second Generation Reforms, Washington DC: Moses Naim, October 26, 1999 [online].

[4]Rodrik, Dani. “The Global Governance of Trade as if Development Really Mattered,” New York: UNDP, 2001 [online].

[5] Kanbur, Ravi. “The Strange Case of the Washington Consensus; A Brief Note on John Williamson’s ‘What Should the World Bank Think About the Washington Consensus?’” Ithaca: Ravi Kanbur, July 1999 [online].

[6]Naim, Moses. “Washington Consensus or Washington Confusion?” Foreign Policy. Washington, DC: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, No. 118 (Spring 2000) [online].

[7]Rothschild, Emma. “Globalization and the Return of Europe (Who is Europe?).” Foreign Policy. Washington, DC: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, No. 115 (Summer 1999) [online].

[8]Stiglitz, Joseph. Link to recent books: [online].

[9]Williamson, Jeffrey G. “Winners and Losers Over Two Centuries of Globalization.” NBER Working Paper No. 9161. Presented as the Annual WIDER lecture. Cambridge: Jeffrey G. Williamson, September 2002 [online].